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More than (Dementia) Friends

There’s not many times I look over the Border and think ‘I wish we had that’.  So I was delighted when Dementia Friends launched in Scotland and even happier to get my badge. Already a great success, Dementia Friends is a wonderful resource and a very quick and easy way of helping folk find out more about dementia; a boon for our aspiring Dementia Friendly Communities.

But it’s just a start, we need more.

In the world of paid caring, they already have quite a developed approach to using people to make change happen. Health and social care services staff have a Dementia Champions Programme which supports people to act as change agents. There are also Dementia Ambassadors who help spread knowledge and understanding about dementia.

When I read about these schemes I wanted to help, after all, walking alongside our loved ones with dementia gives us a very keen appreciation of the importance of respect and understanding amongst the paid workforce as well as the community dimension. We’ve got concrete experience of what makes a difference and are a powerful force for change. We can tell you in words of one syllable why a smile matters.

I was amazed to find that the scheme doesn’t include unpaid carers, I can’t be a champion or ambassador. I was gobsmacked. They should biting our hands off. In the words of the late great Ian Dury, what a waste.

A few e mails and I soon found people who got it and  I was introduced to the Equal Partners in Care ( EPIC) programme. It’s all about helping paid staff in health and social care settings work more closely and effectively with carers.

A short while later, Val from my Mum’s care home (who’s a Dementia Ambassador),  Scott (Mum’s then key worker) and me were interviewed by Gill for EPIC. We each talked about how by working together Mum got great care, I was happy and Val and Scott loved their jobs. It’s just better for everyone in every way.

It felt like a celebration and a chance to say how much we value each other.  Like when Mum gets upset when I leave, Scott comes over and says ‘Goodness gracious me!’ Mum giggles and says ‘Great balls of fire!’ And the pair of them, and everyone else in earshot, beam. Mum sees his smiling face, feels at home and waves me off quite happily. I leave knowing Mum is happy and safe. I never leave with that horrible guilt and worry about what happens when the door closes behind me. I don’t want anyone to leave a loved one like that.

I couldn’t do their job, but I am so glad people like Val and the other staff are round to help me and Mum through. They walk beside us and I can’t begin to explain how that helps.

It’s so important that the voices and lived experiences of people affected by dementia are part of the change process in health settings not just in the community. Friends are great, but we also need powerful Ambassadors and Champions; a growing number of people living with dementia across Scotland want to have their say and we all need to be included.  We are an important part of the change process. Most people who live with dementia – before or after a diagnosis, unpaid carer or family member – are in a community. People in residential care and hospitals are still part of our communities. The paid carers of the future and people who might get dementia in the future are in our communities, in schools, jobs, shops. We have to be a more powerful part of the equation.

The world needs to change too and we need to do it together.

So welcome to Scotland Dementia Friends. Now let’s have the rest. Please.

Cheers

Sue

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Filed under Dementia Friendly Towns, Public Services