Monthly Archives: February 2015

Dementia: The One Stop Guide – an essential handbook for everyone with an interest in dementia

Dementia: The One-Stop Guide: June Andrews.

I wish I’d had this book when I first came across dementia. In plain English and a lovely human down to earth style, Professor Andrews has written a practical guide that will be an invaluable resource for everyone affected by dementia. I love the practical focus: how to stay well as long as possible and avoid going downhill faster than you need to. That’s the reality of the challenge of dementia for people who have it, who worry about having it, carers and professionals.

Dementia brings many questions and many challenges. Have I got dementia? How can I stay in my own home and live independently as long as possible? I’m worried about my Mum’s memory, what do I do? For many of us, it’s a lonely journey, lurching from crisis to crisis, making it up as we go along, feeling lonely and unsupported. This book will help us get through, to take control and help us stop seeing dementia as the end of a useful and meaningful life. It doesn’t have to be.

Dementia: The One Stop Guide brings together science, practice and the lived experience of dementia to guide the reader through many of the ups and downs that living with dementia brings and provides practical realistic suggestions for what to do.

Quotes from people living and working with dementia made me laugh, made me cry, made me grind my teeth with frustration and, most importantly, helped me realise I wasn’t alone. Hearing the voices of people who have dementia is particularly powerful, giving an insight into what dementia is really like, starting to break down the stigma and barriers that can be as damaging as the disease itself. Helping us see a person with choices and options not the helpless victim or sufferer.

You can see how to reduce your risk of dementia and how to take control and start making plans if you get a diagnosis. Of course none of us know the moment or what lies ahead, so reducing the risk and planning for our older age are things that are worth doing whether you’ve got dementia or not. Theres information on things from getting Power of Attorney (which everyone should do, none of us know the moment) to how to make your house dementia friendly so you can stay there longer (simple suggestions that won’t make your house look like a primary school).

If I had this book I know I’d have fought harder to stop my Dad getting anti psychotics and I’d have been much better equipped to stop the hospital admissions that we all want to avoid. Trying to get my parents out of hospital when they no longer needed treatment was incredibly hard and as a result of their protracted stays, my  Mum and Dad went downhill much faster than they needed to. This book will help you challenge decisions and sheds some light on the real drivers of ‘bed blocking’ in the NHS which is so unfairly blamed on older people.

The bit on working out the system is a bit frustrating – every part of the country, every areas seems to be different, it’s hard to see the logic behind the way things work. But that I’m afraid simply reflects the way the system works. It does help to know that it’s not just you being thick and there are useful hints about how to keep your head above the choppy waters of our health and social care system. Our politicians and policy makers should read that section and work out a better way of doing things – please.

With the help of this book, you can plan ahead; get practical ideas that will help you or the one you love or support live happily and independently for longer with much less stress all round. For people with dementia and carers it will help you have more confidence dealing with professionals and it does help to know you’re not alone in feeling confused, invisible or frustrated. It will help you take control and keep control.

If you’re a professional or volunteer working with people with dementia, their carers and families, this will help you too. It will show how important you are to making life good for people living with dementia. How the way you treat them and their carers can make a massive difference. It can also help you raise awareness and support people better too.

This book is a resource for everyone and if I had my way it’d be in every library, every surgery, every day centre and care home and every one living with dementia would have their own copy. Simples.

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